My books of 2012 – Part Eight: Classics

Part One – Biography/Autobiography

Part Two – Non-fiction

Part Three – Historical Fiction

Part Four – Young Adult Fantasy

Part Five – Murder Mystery

Part Six – Fantasy

Part Seven – Young Adult

The Jungle Book – Rudyard Kipling

77270“Run with them. Or fear them–

Bagheera the Panther: A silken shadow of boldness and cunning.

Kaa the Python: A thirty foot battering ram driven by a cool, hungry mind.

Baloo the Bear: who keeps the lore and the Law, and teaches the Secret Words.

Rikki the Mongoose: The young protector who sings as he slays.

Akela and Raksha the Wolves: Demon warriors of the Free People.

Shere Khan the Tiger: The dreaded enemy of all.

And Mowgli the Man-cub: The orphan baby raised by the wolves, taught by Baloo, trained by Bagheera and Kaa. The sorcerer who knows the ways of the jungle and speaks the language of the wild…” – GoodReads

2 stars

At 80 pages this took me far too long to get through. I did not like the story, the writing, pretty much everything about this book. 2 stars is a pretty generous rating.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll

24213“Weary of her storybook, one “without pictures or conversations,” the young and imaginitive[sic] Alice follows a hasty hare underground — to come face-to-face with some of the strangest adventures and most fantastic characters in all of literature. The Ugly Duchess, the Mad Hatter, the weeping Mock Turtle, the diabolical Queen of Hearts, the Cheshire Cat — each more eccentric than the last — could only have come from that master of sublime nonsense, Lewis Carroll. In penning this brilliant burlesque of children’s literature, this farcical satire of rigid Victorian society, this arresting parody of the fears, anxieties, and complexities of growing up, Carroll was one of the few adult writers to enter successfully the children’s world of make-believe, where the impossible becomes possible, the unreal, real, and where the heights of adventure are limited only by the depths of imagination.” – GoodReads

3 stars

I liked it, but not as much as I liked the Tim Burton movie version. Maybe I just don’t like classic children books.

The Picture of Dorian Gray – Oscar Wilde

5297“Written in his distinctively dazzling manner, Oscar Wilde’s story of a fashionable young man who sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty is the author’s most popular work. The tale of Dorian Gray’s moral disintegration caused a scandal when it first appeared in 1890, but though Wilde was attacked for the novel’s corrupting influence, he responded that there is, in fact, “a terrible moral in Dorian Gray.” Just a few years later, the book and the aesthetic/moral dilemma it presented became issues in the trials occasioned by Wilde’s homosexual liaisons, which resulted in his imprisonment. Of Dorian Gray’s relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, “Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be—in other ages, perhaps.”” – GoodReads

4 stars

This was a really good read. Not always easy, but worth it in the end. The story is strange and original.