My Books of 2013 – Part 4: Classics

Previously: Part 3 – Fiction

I try to read a couple of “classics” (or old books) each year, to broaden my literary knowledge and maybe boast a bit?

The Valley of Fear (Sherlock Holmes #7) – Arthur Conan Doyle

736130Holmes and faithful Dr. Watson are summoned to a country house by a coded message. They arrive too late to save a life, but pursue the trail to unmasking the murderer.

I like reading the Sherlock Holmes stories. They are good mysteries and feel like the basis of what modern murder-mystery stories are based on. The one thing I like less about these is that it is very hard to figure out the mystery for yourself because you are never given all the same clues as Sherlock.

Aug. 13

Little Women (Little Women #1) – Louisa May Alcott

6252154Little Women is the heartwarming story of the March family that has thrilled generations of readers. It is the story of four sisters–Jo, Meg, Amy and Beth– and of the courage, humor and ingenuity they display to survive poverty and the absence of their father during the Civil War.

I liked this book. It is a nice story about a family sticking together through tough times and always trying to do right. Sometimes it felt a little too moralizing. I think that is both a sign of the times and the author.

Oct. 8 – Oct. 12

Good Wives (Little Women #1.5) – Louisa May Alcott

78960Amy looked relieved, but naughty Jo took her at her word, for during the first call she sat with every limb gracefully composed, every fold correctly draped, calm as a summer sea, cool as a snowbank, and as silent as the sphinx. In vain Mrs. Chester alluded to her ‘charming novel’, and the Misses Chester introduced parties, picnics, the opera, and the fashions. Each and all were answered by a smile, a bow, and a demure “Yes” or “No” with the chill on.

I did not realize when I started Little Women that the story is sometimes split into two (Little Women and Good Wives). I felt like I had to read Good Wives as well now that I’d read Little Women. Like the first book, it exudes decency. The girls make mistakes, remember the lessons their mom told them and fix their mistakes. Nothing in real life is ever that easy (at least not to me).

Oct. 13 – Oct. 20

The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald

6519719The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when,┬áThe New York Times┬áremarked, “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s that resonates with the power of myth.

I read this book now because of the new film version released this year. I haven’t seen the film but I did really enjoy the book. I found Gatsby intriguing and liked that the story was told from the point of view of a “normal” person, someone we could identify with.

Oct. 21 – Oct. 24

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer – Mark Twain

11323701Impish, daring young Tom Sawyer is a hero to his friends and a torment to his relations. For wherever there is mischief or adventure, Tom is at the heart of it. During one hot summer, Tom witnesses a murder, runs away to be a pirate, attends his own funeral, rescues an innocent man from the gallows, searches for treasure in a haunted house, foils a devilish plot and discovers a box of gold. But can he escape his nemesis, the villainous Injun Joe?

This was much more readable than I had expected for such an old book (it was first published in 1876). It was an enjoyable story, although clearly from a different time. Children these days wouldn’t get away with all that Tom Sawyer gets away with.

Oct. 31 – Nov. 6

Next: Part 5 – Non-fiction